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The State of Social Advertising 2014

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(Posted on Apr 18, 2014 at 03:52AM by William Cosgrove)
Socialbakers surveyed over 500 marketing professionals, spanning 82 countries and 20 industries to better understand where social media is heading in 2014. The State of Social Marketing, Part One, concerned the priorities and practices of marketers. Part Two defines the state of social media advertising, from how Fortune 500 companies operate with no social advertising budget to why Twitter struggles to attract advertisers.

Read Part One: The State of Social Marketing

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Supporting organic reach with paid advertising is the new normal in social media marketing. No matter how targeted or engaging your content is, the fact remains, the social party is crowded and you have to pay for a soapbox. But 14% of companies with more than 5,000 employees reported a $0 social ad budget for 2014. Their content stands alone to fight the noise and competition increasingly present in users’ News Feeds, both from personal connections and competing brands.

However, most companies who know how valuable a well-optimized social strategy can be understand that social advertising is a must. Furthermore, it’s money well spent for brands who optimize and measure their social ad performance.
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It’s not shocking that marketers say News Feed (native) ads are more effective than other placement options. But when you look closely at specified News Feed placements (desktop News Feed vs mobile News Feed vs desktop/mobile News Feed) it becomes clear that marketers aren’t able to distinguish between the three placement types. This points to the fact that marketers are still evolving and learning to fully leverage improved ad targeting provided by leading social networks. The majority have yet to discover the benefit of creating mobile specific content and CTAs.

However, if we compare similar data from a survey conducted in January 2013, we can see that marketers are getting smarter. Then, 81% of Facebook ads used “Facebook All” placement. As of December 2013, that number has been reduced to 42% and News Feed ads lead the way for effective social advertising by a landslide. Right-hand side ads were so 2009.
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The fact that brands are not flocking to Twitter’s adver­tising platform may not speak directly to the platforms’ ability to offer something of value, but rather, to marketers’ inability to effectively adapt to this new form of social advertising.

Twitter launched promoted posts and promoted tweets in March 2012 to a select number of small business and has cautiously expanded this select group to include beverages, athletic apparel, and even a certain Commander-in-chief. Despite Twitter advertisings’ unique appeal, advanced targeting, and proven ROI for a number of brands and verticals, most brands have been quicker to adapt to social advertising on LinkedIn, YouTube, and the Mother of Platform Monetization, Facebook.
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13.5: that’s the average number of social media pages managed by marketers in our survey. That’s more than 13 different pages (potentially of various countries, languages, and products) that all need to publish and promote content at the right time, to the right audience. But even so, the majority of marketers replied that they manage their social advertising via native platforms!

While many social networks, such as Facebook, have made leaps and bounds to improve their advertising platforms, this approach does not provide any efficiencies for managing multiple pages across multiple social networks. Using a 3rd party application for social advertising simplifies the experience giving marketers more time to do what they do best – create amazing and engaging content for their audience.
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One might conclude that along with company growth and expanded resources, something like social media – a function so close to the heart and soul of brand’s identity – would be reigned-in and managed in-house. This data, however, paints a different picture of social media outsourcing: the bigger the company, the more social media work is outsourced. But if you take a closer look at the data, something changes when it comes to post boosting. When compared to ad management and performance reporting, many brands that prefer to outsource social marketing elements chose to keep post boosting in-house. Perhaps this speaks to the holistic approach of boosting “good” content. When marketers see something going well, they know it, and want to support it with ad spend immediately. Did you know there’s a tool that does this for you?

What Do You Think?What do you think about the State of Social Marketing 2014? Does this reflect your own social marketing practices? Let us know here in the comments, on Twitter, or Facebook. We’d love to hear your feedback.

Stay involved in the ever-changing conversation around social media and join us at Engage London 2014. A social media event for marketers, by marketers. Speakers include Beth Foster, Social Strategist at Google, and Robertjan Groenveld, Social Media Hub Manager at KLM. Early bird registration ends March 31st. We hope to see you there!

Who Did We Ask? We surveyed over 500 marketing professionals for a number of industries including Education (13%), E-commerce (9%), Software (9%), Travel (9%), Nonprofit (9%), and Retail (7%). Because social media marketing is not exclusive to large companies, like many above the line communications are, we asked start-ups and fortune 500 companies a­like.

Carly Guglielmelli, Social Media Manager

Is personalisation really worthwhile- or are marketers missing the mark?

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(Posted on Mar 14, 2014 at 06:16AM by William Cosgrove)


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When we walk into a shop or a restaurant we appreciate the personal touch, and being treated as an individual goes a long way. Now, with consumers spending more of their time online, marketers must take steps to maintain the “personal experience” across a brand's entire digital presence.

Building up a rapport without having the opportunity to meet face-to-face isn't easy, but there are ways to achieve it. The emergence of Big Data, for example, is allowing marketers to drill down into an incredible level of detail, and this in-depth understanding of who is visiting the website, mobile site or app, enables marketers to target customers with things that make the whole journey more relevant.

Just like being in a clothes shop and the assistant suggesting things they think you might like, thanks to Big Data, brands can offer their customers articles, adverts or products which are more relevant to them. 

When done right, personalisation is a win-win for both the customer and the brand. There is a treasure trove of information on people visiting a site that marketers can use to deliver an online experience that, much like a real-life service, is tailored to suit the customer.

This way, the consumer has a better experience through things like exclusive offers, or information on products that interest them, resulting in three key elements of loyal behaviour; willingness to buy more, reluctance to switch and likelihood to recommend. 

Time wasted? 

Personalisation has evolved very quickly. A few years ago, you’d be lucky to get a simple “welcome back” on a website, let alone a web page specific to you. By trying to transform into an integrated, multichannel business and through harnessing Big Data to learn about each online shopper, brands can now greet their customer with a site that suits them rather than just a simple “hello again”.

Nonetheless, despite the benefits to the customer of a personalised experience, our "Click Here: The State of Online Advertising" research found that just 23% of those surveyed find customisation valuable, which suggests brands still aren’t getting it right.

This is an important wake up call to brands and should make us question if it is a worthwhile practice, or if brands and marketers are simply missing the mark.

We only need to look to brands like RSA, one of the world's largest insurance companies, to know that when personalisation is done properly it works.

RSA is able to determine what kinds of services customers want and, in response, continually optimise online experiences. By capturing insights into its customers' interests and preferences, it is addressing its customers as individuals and the results speak for themselves. Conversion is up 2% and profits are up by almost £1 per sale, proving that personalisation can and will have value to the customer - as well as a huge impact on the bottom line.

The same Click Here: State of Online Advertising research found other brands doing it well include online giants Amazon, eBay and TripAdvisor, with their helpful product and page suggestions inevitably playing a big role in them being named by consumers as top brands for personalisation.

Creating demand

Online marketers clearly understand the benefits of personalisation, with 52% of those surveyed claiming that being able to effectively personalise content is central to their marketing strategy, and 71% claiming it has a big impact on ROI. 

If brands want to maximise the benefits personalisation has to offer, they need customers to not just be accepting of it but to actually demand it. It is only when individuals experience and appreciate the same personal touch online as they do in-store that a strong, two-way relationship will emerge.

The only way marketers can create this demand is to do personalisation well, and for this to happen there should be a number of considerations. First, there needs to be a seamless experience for the customer across all channels, campaigns and marketing activities. Marketers can then analyse the customer's digital journey to decipher when conversion is highest, and create the personalised experience that has the most potential to grow conversion or engagement. Timing is also key in the online marketing process, and it is important to capitalise on the customer’s interest in your products as early as possible. 

Fortunately, the technology now exists to do most of the hard work, deciding which content and offers are most relevant to the customer. But while the machines can look after most of the data and analytics, a blend of data-led and intuitive marketing often works best.

If marketers continue to improve their understanding of the individual customer, delivering what they want, when they want it, customers may join marketers in realising the real value of the "personal touch".

Tresilian Segal is head of marketing Northern Europe at Adobe Marketing Cloud.

Fear-Based Marketing: Effective or Evil?

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(Posted on Mar 8, 2014 at 03:43AM by William Cosgrove)



Fear is one of our most primal emotions, instilled from infancy. When my dad said I better stop crying or he’d give me something to cry about, do you know what I did?

 

I shut the hell up.
 

Listerine adYes, our natural instinct to avoid danger or harm is a powerful motivator and influencer of behavior. Always has been, always will be.

 

Not surprisingly, marketers caught on to this fact decades ago, whether they were selling financial services or personal hygiene products. And while many marketers took a respectable approach, others went straight for the gutter.

 

For example, in this 1932 advertorial, Listerine tried to make women feel like they would end up with a dog instead of a husband because of bad breath. (Image courtesy of Duke University Libraries)


 


On the other hand, you’ll probably remember this legendary and hugely influential anti-drug message, which also spawned its fair share of spoofs:


 

The Three Basic Steps of Fear-Based Marketing

Scientific studies have been done to evaluate various approaches to fear-based marketing, but appealing to someone’s fear typically involves three steps.

 

1) Present a risk or threat that arouses fear. The risk or threat has to be realistic and severe enough to motivate your audience to act. This is why you need to do your research and know your audience instead of making assumptions.

 

2) Show how vulnerable your audience is. If you try to scare someone with sensationalistic claims, you’re being manipulative. Instead, discuss the real consequences of not acting.

 

3) Explain how you can protect your audience. Convince your audience that the risk reduction or threat removal is worth the effort and cost involved with using your product or service.

 

This is when most marketers screw up. They revert to marketing-speak, going on and on about how wonderful their product is.

A critical part of the third step is building up your audience’s self-efficacy – the belief that they’re physically, mentally and emotionally strong enough to take action. If someone feels they can’t control their fear, they won’t act.

In other words, you’re not just selling your product as the solution. You’re empowering your audience to face and overcome their fear.

Helping People Overcome Fear to Make Positive Changes

In a previous post, I discussed the power of pain point marketing. Like pain point marketing, fear-based marketing doesn’t exploit people’s desperation. It also doesn’t have to involve a life or death situation.

 

Are financial advisors being evil if they warn people of the consequences of failing to save for retirement?

Is a doctor being evil by telling people that drinking one can of soda per day can dramatically increase their chance of chronic illness? True, by the way, according to a recent study.

 

There’s a big difference between persuasion and manipulation. Fear-based marketing can be a perfectly acceptable and ethical approach to marketing, as long as it’s based in reality, and especially when you use marketing to build trust and establish yourself or your company as an authority.

 

When delivered powerfully yet respectfully, fear-based marketing does more than motivate people to buy products and services. It can motivate people make positive changes in their lives.

Many people tend to bury their fears and pretend they don’t exist. They allow their emotions to cloud the cold, hard facts and refuse to admit they’re afraid of anything. A fear-based marketing message can help people accept reality and face their fears.

 

The Verdict

Some marketers believe any negativity is poison in marketing, and tapping into someone’s fear is the equivalent of emotional blackmail.

Unfortunately, real life isn’t all pretty flowers and rainbows. Marketing should reflect real life, complete with real fears and real problems. Imagine the sense of relief someone would feel if you empower them to overcome their fear and neutralize a genuine risk or threat.

 

As marketers, we’re not being evil. We’re doing our job.

by Scott McKelvey
 

 


 


5 Things you need to know about the cost of not doing Website Maitntenance

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(Posted on Jan 20, 2014 at 01:45AM by William Cosgrove)

Regular website maintenance is non-negotiable and should be an ongoing affair. Over and above adding new pages, your website maintenance should also link to the performance of your website; it’s imperative that you continuously maintain your site to ensure it’s performing at its optimum.

The infographic below was created by Smartbear, a company that specialises in software testing. The infographic shows how small things like enhancing the page load speed can improve the revenue you can generate from your website.

1. Site loading speed is paramount
Do you know how long your site takes to load? You may have initially factored in loading times when your website was first designed, but through your regular website maintenance you could have changed something that adversely affects your loading speed, a huge factor in loss of visitors.

Factors that influence the speed of your site include: your server, content on your site and widgets used on your site that are hosted by a third party. A massive 57% of people will leave a site within the first three seconds if the site is perceived to be too slow. Shockingly, most major retail sites take ten or more seconds to load – a whole seven seconds too long.

2. One second is a long time

Let’s look at what a mere one second added to your loading time will do:

  • 11% fewer page views
  • 16% decrease in customer satisfaction
  • 7% loss in conversion

    In monetary terms, if you use Amazon as an example, a one second decrease would result in the loss of $1.6 billion annually. If you want to make sure you aren’t losing revenue due to slow page loading time, regular website maintenance based on page speed optimisation cannot be ignored.

    3. More money is moving online
    The research company Forrester recently predicted that by 2016, 9% off all global retail sales will be conducted online. Retailers spend a huge amount of money optimising the flow of their stores in malls, increasingly though if you want to secure business through your online engagement with customers, regular website maintenance is the first step in making their user experience as enjoyable as possible.

    4. Don’t ignore your conversion forms
    Most people are familiar with the generic HTML contact form employed on numerous websites. These forms fulfil the important task of letting your audience make contact, enquire about your product or services or request a quote. While these forms are useful, they’re often also a source of irritation and therefore loss of revenue. These are the most common things that’ll put people off using your HTML contact form.

    Too many fields: Make filling in the form as quick and easy as possible by minimising the number of required fields.

    Form validation is too strict: Don’t make people jump through hoops in order to make contact. Again, simplicity and ease of use is key.

    The much hated re-typing of some obscure word or phrase: Find another way to ward off spam – this is probably one of the most annoying things encountered on the web today.

    Making someone re-type information: Don’t put people off by making this a laborious task. If they’ve already entered certain information such as their address or shirt size, have a system in place that’ll automatically repeat it when necessary.

    Regularly analysing and maintaining all of the forms on your site will keep your user’s experience pleasant. This goes a long way towards converting them into clients. Remember that these forms are the lifeline of your online business. The cost of not maintaining your online forms is potentially massive – even more so than your loading speed.

    Website maintenance impacts your communication
    A large portion of your communication will entail the building of landing pages for specific campaigns, competitions or a destination they’re directed to upon replying to one of your emails. If you don’t have a marketing automation system or an easy-to-use content management system (CMS) to do this for you, you’ll have to go through the costly exercise of hiring a designer and programmer every single time you need a new page.

    An automated marketing system will not only allow you to easily to maintain your website but should also do things such as automatically personalising each email you send, or personalising a website based on an individual’s preference
    By Gareth Slaven

The Future Of Advertising: "Pay Per Gaze" Is Just The Beginning

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(Posted on Aug 16, 2013 at 06:39AM by William Cosgrove)
 
Advertising is going to change more in the next 20 years than it has in the last 100. If you need proof of that, just look at the patent Google was granted Thursday for a Google Glass-based ad system.

Dubbed "pay-per-gaze," the content would charge advertisers for the number of times someone literally looked at their ad. The concept is buried pages deep in a patent for a "gaze tracking technique ... implemented with a head-mounted gaze-tracking device that communicates with a server."

SEE ALSO: New Patent Hints at 'Pay-Per-Gaze' Advertising for Google Glass


It would likely make money hand over fist, and is clearly the main future-focused impetus for the patent. But it's far from the only one.

What is this head-mounted gaze-tracking device of which they speak? "Eyeglasses including side-arms that engage ears of the user, a nose bridge that engages a nose of the user, and lenses through which the user views the external scenes, wherein the scene images are captured in real-time," says the patent. It never uses the word Google Glass — but if someone can explain to me the difference between that device description and Google Glass, I'd love to hear it.

So to recap: the world's largest search engine was just granted a patent for the most sticky form of advertising possible — ads that literally flash in front of your eyes. Google gets paid when it can ascertain that your pupils pointed in that direction, and for how long. And all of this on the device it is currently seeding among the influencers of the tech community.

In other words, Google Glass is going to bring a whole new meaning to "made you look."

Phase Two: Pay-Per-EmotionNow it's Google, so they're likely to be smart and subtle about it. It'll start by offering an extra layer of reality-augmented ads when you're looking at specific Glass-friendly billboards. Hey, it was obviously an ad, and you looked at it, so you must be interested.

You know advertisers will pay for this sort of high-tech gimmick as an add-on to their campaign; it's an easy way to look hip and gain media coverage without spending all that much on the test-bed target audience.

At this point, depending on the reaction to phase one, local advertisers may get interested. You may start to see menus pop up in restaurant windows, and the restaurant pays if your eyes linger over a given menu item.

Either way, this is all just a prelude to phase two, in which the Google Glass camera will intensify its gaze on you.

Phase two, as described in the patent, will be pay-per-emotion. If the ad can make your eyes dilate — say, a picture of a particularly delicious slice of pizza in a restaurant window, or a racy Gap ad — the advertiser pays more.

"Pupil dilation can be correlated with emotional states, (e.g., surprise, interest, etc.)," the patent helpfully reminds us. And it's simplicity itself for a camera that's tracking your gaze to track the size of the gazing subject's eyes.

The Far Future of AdvertisingThis is exactly the sort of thing that made William Gibson quit writing science fiction. We seem to be entering an era where tastemakers are willingly accepting augmented advertising that is flashed on their eyeballs by the world's most technically advanced multinational. That's more cyberpunk than most cyberpunk.

So let's get ahead of the game and speculate in even more outlandish sci-fi ways that are already technically feasible. If Google Glass advertising is smart and successful enough, if it gently overcomes the creepiness factor with the glories of convenience, what next?

Well, we already have prototype devices that can read and translate your electromagnetic brainwaves, believe it or not; you can literally think instructions to them. You can be as precise as thinking of a particular number or letter, and the device can read them; this was shown in experiments as early as 2000.

SEE ALSO: Are Brain Waves and Heartbeats the Future of Passwords? [VIDEO]


The first time I tried one, in 2009 — the Epoc by Emotiv — it was a helmet-sized thing with plastic tendrils plugged into a PC. Within two years, such prototypes were the size of a headband and worked with your smartphone; after all, they're just readers of electromagnetic activity. I have no doubt Google Glass version 3.0 could do this with spectacle frames pressed to your temples.

The ultimate implementation of this for advertising, marketing and sales? Here's what occurred to me 13 years ago when I first read about those mind-reading number-and-letter experiments:just wait until credit card companies get hold of this. You'll be thinking your account numbers at advertising in no time.

SEE ALSO: Brain-Scanning Headphones Match Songs to Your Mood


Think about it, no pun intended. If you were really hungry, really wanted that pizza, and could order it automatically by simply by looking at it and thinking your credit card number, why wouldn't you?

This is where we really go down the rabbit hole of the future. Because if you only have to think your number at a picture, do checkouts vanish? Does every store become an automat?

Will people want to carry hefty shopping bags, or simply look at displays to have whatever they like overnighted to their homes? Will the malls of the future start to look like art galleries?

Is there ever going to be a technological line beyond which advertising won't go? Leave your predictions in the comments.

By Chris Taylor


DealerNet Services

A Decade into E-mail Marketing: Where Are We Now?

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(Posted on Aug 1, 2013 at 09:05AM )

Are you getting the results you want from your email marketing campaigns? Email marketing has been around for a while now, and there’s a reason it’s such a popular channel in most marketers’ toolboxes. Savvy interactions can deepen customer relationships, inspire new ones, nurture and convert leads, and strengthen brand awareness. By delivering compelling messages tailored to specific customer triggers, marketers can take leads from engagement to purchase.

That said, not every marketer is getting the maximum results possible from their email marketing initiatives.  In fact, some are completely missing the boat. To learn more about how to maximize your email marketing initiatives, be sure to download our new ebook, A Decade into Email Marketing: Where Are We Now?

The Evolution of Email Marketing

It’s true that we’ve come a long way from the early days of blast campaigns that usually hit the wrong customers, ended up in the spam filter, or simply created feelings of annoyance and intrusion. In fact, the time has never been better to be a marketer. Technologies like marketing automation allow companies to design polished messages that deliver the most relevant conversations to the right prospect at the perfect time. Lets face it, email has always been a cheap medium as well, with no printing and shipping costs to worry about, email helps mid-market and emerging businesses compete with the big leagues.  Consider the cost of executing a digital campaign these days vs. the postage driven campaigns of just a few decades ago and you can see how powerful email is not only in terms of engagement but also as a cost cutting measure.

These days we use email for all kinds of initiatives. Whether we want to reenergize fading leads, deepen engagement with existing customers or launch irresistible upsell and cross-sell offers, we’ve got the tools to tailor our messaging with unprecedented precision. And as mobile rises in popularity with countless users, leads are more connected to their email than ever before.

Creating a Seamless Cross-Channel Experience

So what’s the problem? The truth is that there are so many strategies and channels to consider that many marketers feel overwhelmed. Some are uncertain of which tactics they should be using; some are pursuing unproductive initiatives; some are jumping from strategy to strategy without sticking to one long enough to see results. Still others are applying one overarching plan across all channels, without considering the specific parameters for social and mobile campaigns or the role of smartphones and tablets. To create a seamless cross-channel user experience, email strategies must align with the appropriate platforms.

Authenticity Through Relevance

The rapid evolution of marketing technologies has left many marketers with a skill gap, and others completely in the dust. Even businesses that have invested in good marketing platforms often lack the training to fully understand how segmentation, testing and analytic tools can help them drive ROI and measure campaign performance. Another common issue: the failure to understand the necessity of tailored and engaging content. The days of predictable promotional emails are over, and marketers must create relevant emails that foster an authentic connection with customers. Not only can such relevance make the difference between a delete and a transaction, but techniques such as initiating transactional emails or driving readers to dynamic landing pages on marketing platforms can boost conversions, revenue and brand visibility.

So let me ask you again: are you getting the most you can out of your email marketing campaigns? Are you using the right strategies for the right channels? To help you decide – and learn some new tricks – we’ve put together a new ebook, A Decade into Email Marketing: Where are We Now?, which focuses on deft marketing strategies to help you maximize the potential of this rich marketing tool. We’ll share the 5 pathways to high-impact campaigns that attract, convert and close. Take a look and discover how you can design emails that turn leads into customers and engagement into sales.

Want to learn even more about email marketing? Be sure to pre-register for Marketo’s upcoming Definitive Guide to Engaging Email Marketing available on August 7th!
Author: Justin Gray

DealerNet Services

 

“To Sell Is Human” by Daniel Pink: Book in a Nutshell

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(Posted on Jul 13, 2013 at 12:06PM by William Cosgrove)
When you think of sales, do you think of pejoratives such as pushy, sleazy and dishonest? Most people do.

Yet in “To Sell Is Human: The Surprising Truth About Moving Others,” Daniel H. Pink contends that most of us, regardless of job title or salary structure, are salespeople.

What?

Sales, broadly defined, means moving people to action, which people must do well to be successful.

This “non-sales selling” doesn’t involve a purchase—it simply means persuading, influencing and convincing others. Not only does this comprise 41 percent of total work time, according to an international study with 9,057 respondents that Pink paid for, but people say it’s the most productive use of their time.

While only one in nine Americans works in sales per se, the other eight are selling others on learning chemistry, on using new media for marketing, or on exercising more.

What Pink calls “EdMed”—healthcare and education—has a large sales component. This is the biggest job sector in the U.S., with more workers than manufacturing, retail and professional and business services, and projected to grow the most.

Pink, following up bestsellers “A Whole New Mind” and “Drive,” wants to clean up its bad reputation and recast sales not as a way to get the best of others, but to improve the world. As he explains the book’s title, “Moving others doesn’t require that we neglect these nobler aspects [idealism and artistry] of our nature . . . Today it demands that we embrace them.”

Pink’s ABCs Of Sales

Some of Pink’s advice is supported by conventional wisdom but not all; Pink draws heavily upon sometimes surprising social science research.

“Attunement” is the first thing we should learn. If we don’t understand others, how can we hope to persuade them?

It’s about getting into their heads with perspective as well as hearts  through empathy. Powerful people are prone to losing touch with others’ perspectives. So paradoxically, reducing one’s power or becoming humble is a must.

Mimicry helps. If you subtly mirror another’s gestures, you will seem more in tune, but if the other person senses your mirroring is staged, he or she will be turned off.

Surprisingly, extroverts don’t make the best salespeople, but neither do introverts.

What works best is being an “ambivert,” which is most of us in the middle of the bell curve. Extreme extroverts are often awful listeners and can be pushy, while an extreme introvert can lack initiative and the ability to close a deal. Ambiverts who can tack back and forth between extroversion and introversion do better at attunement.

If you think your failures are “permanent, pervasive and personal,” you lack “buoyancy.” Those who bounce back, says Pink, attribute rejection to circumstances: it’s a slow economy, he’s having a bad day.

Positive emotions are contagious, so when negotiating, taking a friendly tone and smiling works better than being adversarial, despite what’s portrayed in movies. Your positive emotions (gratitude, interest, contentment) should outnumber negative (anger, shame, sadness) by at least 3-1 but not going over 11-1. Too much risks detachment from reality—not taking responsibility for what one can control and learning from failures is important.

It’s less important to motivate yourself with clichés like “I’m the best” than to simply ask, “Can I do it?” A question opens you up to problem solving and boosts confidence.

The final attribute, “clarity,” means the “capacity to help others see their situations in fresh and more revealing ways and to identify problems they didn’t realize they had.”

Today people often have all the facts at hand—they just need help applying information. For example, maybe you thinks you need a better presence on Facebook when you’ll find more leads elsewhere, or maybe a bad website is actually holding you back more than your social media strategy—redefining the problem to better meet goals is what standout salespeople excel at.

In this paradigm brainstorming trumps quick fixes and the successful sellers are the ones who take the time to develop relationships and understand their clients.

Putting It All Together

“Pitching,” “improvising” and “serving” are three tactics Pink highlights for putting your skills to work.

He identifies six “successors to the elevator pitch” including:

  • the one-word pitch: President Obama’s re-election pitch, “forward”
  • Reagan’s question pitch: “Are you better off today than you were four years ago?”
  • the memorable rhyming pitch: “If the glove don’t fit, you must acquit”
  • the email subject line pitch: pithy and specific, “10 Selling Tips”
  • the Twitter pitch: don’ts include complaints and “here’s what I had for dinner” (does anyone like hearing that?)
  • the Pixar pitch, a six-sentence structure, part of which often introduces a movie’s trailer: “Once upon a time _____. Every day, _____. One day ___. Because of that, ___. Until finally ___.”

Every sales pitch, Pink shows, can be put into each of these formats.

Pink then visits an improvisational acting coach to understand how improv can expand the repertoire of business people. In her hilarious memoir “Bossypants,” Tina Fey also elaborates on how improv comedy works. Here’s the basics, per Pink:

  • Say “yes and,” not “yes but”
  • Make your partner look good
  • Hear offers

The final suggestion, in what I consider the takeaway of this book, is to be a server, not a taker. Don’t “upsell,” which is a “detestable” word; “upserve,” he exhorts. Treat everyone as you’d treat your grandmother. Rethink the idea of sales commissions.

 

 

By

DealerNet Services






 

 


 

Closed Loop Analytics Can Improve Your Automotive Marketing

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(Posted on Jul 13, 2013 at 03:04AM by William Cosgrove)
One of the most important elements of any marketing plan is the ability to track the effectiveness of new initiatives.  

The ability to compare conversions prior to and following changes in an email or direct mail campaign can indicate whether you are receiving an adequate return on your marketing investment.  One of the most valuable methods  for determining ROI is closed loop analytics, which provides key metrics of  marketing initiatives. 

In most inbound marketing strategies, analytics play a critical role.  However in an email or direct mail campaign, automotive  closed loop analytics can provide insights that can springboard your marketing  to new levels of success.  

The metrics of automotive closed loop analytics can measure a variety of results including website visits, showroom visits  and purchases.   Depending on the granularity of
your metrics, you may also be able to determine specific  characteristics of these interactions like age group, income, or level of  enthusiasm. 

Comparing the results from before and after an email or direct mail  campaign can help you identify the most important components of your new initiatives and expand them, including:


  • Long-term results—Automotive closed loop analytics can provide
      results throughout the lifetime of your company.  Once you have
    implemented an  analytics system that integrates your email or direct mail
    campaigns with your 
    CRM system,  you can
    continuously receive insights.  As your needs or objectives evolve, you
      can modify the resolution of your analytics to help identify the most lucrative
      consumer markets.

  • Agile system—Most closed loop systems are easily modified to allow 
    virtually immediate results from an email campaign.  If you would like to
    know  how many people clicked on a Call-to-Action (CTA) in the latest batch of
    emails,  then you only need to click a button.  This type of responsiveness
    may require  additional investment up front, but the data available can help
    make your  dealership a success for years to come.

  • Identify key marketing ideas—One of the most elusive objectives in
      any marketing strategy is identifying the marketing message that is most
      effective. Automotive closed loop analytics can instantly identify those
      components and help you understand why they are so successful.  For
    example you  may find lifetime service options are a key to maintaining customer
      relationships which bolster sales.

  • Unique metrics—Measuring ROI on direct mail has been difficult in the
      past, but with the use of new techniques like showroom controls or dedicated
      phone lines, you can accurately measure how effective your new initiative
    is.   Using a phone number exclusively for direct mail responses and
    coupons with RFID  tags can indicate the precise number of reactions with a
    relatively low  cost.

Inbound marketing strategies are designed to coax consumers who are  already interested in purchasing a car find your business and make a purchase.   With the aid of automotive closed loop analytics, you can refine your  marketing strategy to identify those consumers who are most likely to lead to a  sale.  

If you would like some more tips on how to integrate automotive closed loop analytics into your email and direct mail initiatives, download our Automotive Marketing eBook:

If you would like some more tips on how to integrate automotive closed loop analytics into your email and direct mail initiatives, download our Automotive Marketing eBook:
 

http://info.palmeradagency.com/get-more-car-buyers?hsCtaTracking=890b950d-728f-49b4-8203-bf891fa354c9%7C0a330377-b367-4e68-86bb-b1c733f5e9fc




http://dealernetservicesonline.biz

Closed Loop Analytics Can Improve Your Automotive Marketing

Tags:
(Posted on Jul 13, 2013 at 02:59AM by William Cosgrove)
One of the most important elements of any marketing plan is the ability to track the effectiveness of new initiatives.  

The ability to compare conversions prior to and following changes in an email or direct mail campaign can indicate whether you are receiving an adequate return on your marketing investment.  One of the most valuable methods  for determining ROI is closed loop analytics, which provides key metrics of  marketing initiatives. 

In most inbound marketing strategies, analytics play a critical role.  However in an email or direct mail campaign, automotive  closed loop analytics can provide insights that can springboard your marketing  to new levels of success.  

The metrics of automotive closed loop analytics can measure a variety of results including website visits, showroom visits  and purchases.   Depending on the granularity of
your metrics, you may also be able to determine specific  characteristics of these interactions like age group, income, or level of  enthusiasm. 

Comparing the results from before and after an email or direct mail  campaign can help you identify the most important components of your new initiatives and expand them, including:


  • Long-term results—Automotive closed loop analytics can provide
      results throughout the lifetime of your company.  Once you have
    implemented an  analytics system that integrates your email or direct mail
    campaigns with your 
    CRM system,  you can
    continuously receive insights.  As your needs or objectives evolve, you
      can modify the resolution of your analytics to help identify the most lucrative
      consumer markets.

  • Agile system—Most closed loop systems are easily modified to allow 
    virtually immediate results from an email campaign.  If you would like to
    know  how many people clicked on a Call-to-Action (CTA) in the latest batch of
    emails,  then you only need to click a button.  This type of responsiveness
    may require  additional investment up front, but the data available can help
    make your  dealership a success for years to come.

  • Identify key marketing ideas—One of the most elusive objectives in
      any marketing strategy is identifying the marketing message that is most
      effective. Automotive closed loop analytics can instantly identify those
      components and help you understand why they are so successful.  For
    example you  may find lifetime service options are a key to maintaining customer
      relationships which bolster sales.

  • Unique metrics—Measuring ROI on direct mail has been difficult in the
      past, but with the use of new techniques like showroom controls or dedicated
      phone lines, you can accurately measure how effective your new initiative
    is.   Using a phone number exclusively for direct mail responses and
    coupons with RFID  tags can indicate the precise number of reactions with a
    relatively low  cost.

Inbound marketing strategies are designed to coax consumers who are  already interested in purchasing a car find your business and make a purchase.   With the aid of automotive closed loop analytics, you can refine your  marketing strategy to identify those consumers who are most likely to lead to a  sale.  

If you would like some more tips on how to integrate automotive closed loop analytics into your email and direct mail initiatives, download our Automotive Marketing eBook:

If you would like some more tips on how to integrate automotive closed loop analytics into your email and direct mail initiatives, download our Automotive Marketing eBook:
 

http://info.palmeradagency.com/get-more-car-buyers?hsCtaTracking=890b950d-728f-49b4-8203-bf891fa354c9%7C0a330377-b367-4e68-86bb-b1c733f5e9fc




http://dealernetservicesonline.biz

3 reasons SMS Mobile Ads Work

Tags:
(Posted on Jul 12, 2013 at 02:21AM by William Cosgrove)
Before smartphones and tablets ruled the world, SMS text ads or text messaging was what mobile advertising meant.

If used correctly SMS should be highly considered by marketers to boost sales.

1.  One-to-one communication

Unlike mobile search or display across mobile web and applications, a text message is a dedicated piece of communication.  Some would argue that it is better to reach users while in-app or surfing the mobile web as these people are in a state of engagement, but that could also be said of receiving a text message.  The beauty of a text-based ad is that it is simple, direct and easy for someone to respond to.  You are limited to 140 characters, but include a call-to-action via link or text back short-code.  With any strategy, the data will speak for itself.

2.  There are still non-smartphone users!

Yes, there are people that have not embraced all that mobile has to offer.  Don’t miss out on extending your reach or on the opportunity to engage with specific audiences that are slower to adopt.  Craft a strategy that may use SMS text ads to encourage other actions online, in-store or across social platforms, but always get the opt-in via short code text back.

3.  A proven way to (re)engage with current customers

It’s smart to let the consumer choose how they interact with your brand.  If a current customer opts-in to receive your mobile text messages, take advantage.  All engagement funnels matter, whether a person subscribes to your email newsletters, likes you on Facebook, sign-ups for your mailing list, mobile texts communication is the perfect way to engage on the go.  Focus on both consistent and flash promotions.

Here is a great example from our friends at Digiday.

A Domino’s Pizza franchise in Charlotte, NC., wanted to get consumers to like it on Facebook, so it could push deals and offers out to fans.

The pizza chain had traditionally advertised the franchise’s Web address, which redirected to the Facebook group, on the big screen and other displays in the University of North Carolina’s basketball arena. The arena’s announcer read the advertisement while it was displayed. The spots typically lasted between 30 and 60 seconds. The problem with this approach, however, was that most students are not going to jot down a URL during a basketball game. While many students have smartphones, they were unlikely to spend a couple of minutes during a basketball game to visit the Facebook group. On the other hand, taking a couple of seconds to send and receive a text with the URL of the group makes sense. After the game ended, students could then review the text and visit the Facebook group on their smartphones or computers.

To kick things off, the pizza chain created a new ad for the arena displays, offering a free pizza to anyone who texted 49ER to 313131. They received the following response, “To get FREE pizza, join our Facebook group at UNCCDominos.com. Once you join, post a message (I GOT A TEXT) & you will get FREE pizza code Reply STOP 49ER 2 Optout.”

Roughly 10 percent of the 3,000 students attending the game texted in within a few minutes — and another 5 percent did so by the end of the night — resulting in nearly 600 opt-ins. Approximately 350 students had joined the Facebook group by the morning. Nearly all of them redeemed the offer. The response to the advertisement confirmed that texting was dramatically more effective at driving conversions than simply displaying a URL. The pizza chain revised its creative for subsequent games, offering deals like discounted pizzas. Every time the SMS ads ran, the pizza chain saw 100 to 200 opt-ins, nearly all of whom also joined the Facebook group to get the deal.

By the end of the semester, the Facebook group had collected nearly 2,000 fans. They had also added over 850 students to its SMS marketing list.

“The sales at the store when we send text messages, or [use them to] drive people to Facebook, are unprecedented,” said Ryan Swanson, area director for Prairie Pizza, a Domino’s franchise in Charlotte, NC.

http://dealernetservicesonline.biz

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